Treasure Baskets and Chicken Pox

Oh dear, our poor little boy has chicken pox. Emelia had it at the end of January, quite mildly really, so we expected Asa to get it the same time. However, two weeks later, here they are. Our health visitor warned us that Asa would likely have it worse than Emelia as he has been in direct contact with the virus… great. And she was right! The first spots appeared on the 6th February, and every day more bright red, sore looking spots have crept over his little body. Thankfully he isn’t trying to scratch the spots.

Aww my poor little boy…

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Asa asleep in my arms after a very grizzly, milk-refusing kind-of-morning!

20130207_151912Our little man had the pox much worse than Emelia. I’m glad he’s had it now as hopefully he won’t have it again. He’s too young to be trying to scratch the spots so we’re hoping there will be no scarring. Emelia hasn’t scarred either, phew!!

Again, I find myself unable to be in public spaces with the children. We are in quarantine in the house!!! Today is Sunday, and Asa and I are at home. We are sad to be missing church, but at the same time, it is rather nice to have Asa all to myself! …And it’s been so quiet!

This morning, after breakfast, and Jon and Emelia had left, I read Asa a story. It felt a bit strange not having Emelia clambering to join us! We also had chance to get out the ‘treasure basket’ as shown to us in the ‘Speak and Learn’ DS group. Treasure basket is a basket filled of natural materials. In ours, we have a bowl of uncooked pasta, wooden nail brush, a small pebble, baby brush, child’s wooden spoon, feathers (children’s artistic ones, not germ ridden bird feathers!) and a battery operated fan (I know this is not ‘natural’ but what we want is the air!)… The aim of the treasure basket is to introduce Asa to various textures. Some children with learning disabilities have sensory processing disorders whereby they don’t like certain textures. This can be items in contact with their skin such as certain clothing, food texture (something that I recently discovered affects me mildly), wind on faces etc. Not all babies with DS will have sensory issues. Some will, and this is where the treasure basket comes in to play.

What do we do with the treasure basket?

– Put Asa’s hands and feet in the bowl of pasta. This is his favourite treasure activity.
– Rub Asa’s hands, feet, legs, body with nail brush (funnily enough, he’s isn’t a fan! …But nor would I be!)
– Fan Asa’s body all over.
– Asa to experience weight, e.g. holding the pebble in contrast to the feather.
– Let Asa hold different items to feel them. The wooden spoon, even though is a child’s one, is still too big and he knocked himself in the head. No Asa, that wasn’t what was supposed to happen!

P1090864Asa deciding what to explore next!

So, while we have missed being with our church family this morning, we have had some lovely rare mummy and baby alone time. I love Emelia with all my heart, but it is great to be able to have a couple of hours to focus on the therapy and structured play activities that Asa needs to help his development.

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