Shattered Dreams?

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Unable to hold our son that night... :-(

Three months on, and I still see these images in my mind… How bittersweet those first few days were.

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I love the devotionals and blogs written by ‘Girlfriends in God’. These three women write so beautifully for Christian women about faith, life and love, and everything in between. It’s for parents, for busy professionals, for young women and older – for women everywhere.

I don’t read these devotionals every day. Today I read the post from 3rd October. I found this post so moving, so inspiring, so helpful. It’s about shattered dreams that we may face. This may take various forms, such as a divorce, the heartache of infertility, the death of a child, or losing one’s job, and so on.

Here is a snippet from the devotional:

“Every day I receive emails from women who have had their dreams shattered. A husband has an affair, becomes addicted to pornography, abuses the children, or deserts the family. A child gets caught with drugs, becomes pregnant, or dies in a car accident. Parents divorce, friends betray, careers come to an abrupt halt. The list is endless. So what do we do when our dreams are seemingly destroyed? The answer to that will shape the rest of our lives.

 

Does that mean we give up our dreams? I can promise you this, whatever dreams you have for your life, God’s dreams are greater. The power of the Holy Spirit the disciples received after Jesus’ resurrection, and the impact they made on the world thereafter, was beyond their wildest dreams. That’s what God does with a heart that is wholly yielded to Him. That’s what He does when we give our shattered dreams to Him. I have learned to stop saying, “Why me?” but instead start saying “What now?” ”

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When Asa was first born, it was incredible – now we had a baby boy and a little girl! This is the dream right? The dreams we had… Daddy would play football with his boy, teaching him to kick the ball, to ride a bike, to love God. Mummy would choose some adorable little outfits, pray with and for him, wash football kits. Emelia would tease her baby brother, try to dress him in girly clothes, force him to wear makeup or play hairdressers… Perhaps!

Later that night, in the Neonatal Unit, the nurse told us that our perfect little boy had some features of Down’s Syndrome and that the doctor would meet with us tomorrow to discuss it.

*BOOM* – shattered dreams. Would Asa ever get to play football with his dad? Would he be sporty at all? Would he…? Would he…? Would he…? The questions in my mind kept coming. That was possibly one of the worst nights of my life (other than the second night in hospital). My baby was not with me, and was poorly, fighting for oxygen and fighting an infection upstairs in the NNU. My husband was not with me – he was home without his wife and new child. My daughter was not with me – to make me chuckle or distract me from my pain. My God – yes He was with me. Thankfully He is always with me. The Bible tells us He never leaves us or forsakes us (Hebrews 13 v 5), and I know that to be true firsthand.

 P1080936Daddy and his boy, aged 2 days old.

The next day, Saturday 7th July, we met with the doctor who confirmed his suspicions of Asa’s DS. We signed the consent forms for the necessary chromosome testing in a haze, a fog of fear, of worry and of pretending to be fine. I can honestly say that Jon and I thought our dreams were shattered. That second night I sobbed and sobbed, praying God to take the DS away, feeling utterly terrified and alone. What made it worse was that night Asa had two seizures and the doctor couldn’t tell me why.

While pregnant, even though we knew our baby faced a 50% chance of having DS, we didn’t really think it would happen to us. How arrogant we were. How ignorant and foolish. I wish with all my heart we had done our research… We would have seen that our dreams needn’t have felt like they were shattered. I wish then what I know now. That DS isn’t the end of the world. But I can’t go back in time and change that initial reaction. Those ‘bad’ days are lost forever, and I feel guilt for not fully being there for my son. I adore Asa, we both do. He is his own person. DS doesn’t define him. Our dreams for him are similar to Emelia’s – for us to raise him well, for him to be happy, to love God, to go to school and learn, to fall in love and to be loved. Are any of these dreams sounds familiar for your children?

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Sometimes life throws us a curve ball – something that we don’t expect, or imagine, or want, or know how to deal with… Stresses come. Illnesses happen. Death steals. Sin destroys. Yet there is one thing we can do – we can stop saying “why me?” and ask God “what now?” Trust in Him, lean fully on Him with all your heart and go with it.
(It’s ok, I’m telling myself this too, not preaching to you!)

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